Dog Kennel Lane Circuit

This circular walk through Skelton incorporates ancient river crossings, Roman remains and 16th century properties on the Newby Hall Estate.

The route starts on the western edge of Langthorpe on an unmarked lane which was the original carriageway to Brampton Hall. It has had several names over the centuries – Lowfield Lane, Dog Kennel Lane and Brampton Lane

.

Walk Information

Follow the route shown by the dark orange waymarkers.

The full walk is 5miles (8km) long and should take around 2 1/2 hours at a steady pace. Route is flat to Skelton and then rises.

The route from Skelton-on-Ure to Brampton Hall entrance is accessible by wheelchairs and scooters.

OS map Explorer 299 covers this area.

map

 

Key

The Dog Kennel Lane Circuit

Start ofWalk

1 Site of Dog Kennels

2 General Wade’s encampment

3 Brampton Hall

(Private, no access)

4 Mulwith

5 Newby Hall and

Gardens Entrance

6 Christ the Consoler Church

7 Black Lion public house

 

 

 

 

 

 

This circular walk through Skelton incorporates ancient river crossings, Roman remains and 16th century properties on the Newby Hall Estate.

The route starts on the western edge of Langthorpe on an unmarked lane which was the original carriageway to Brampton Hall. It has had several names over the centuries – Lowfield Lane, Dog Kennel Lane and Brampton Lane

.

Walk Information

Follow the route shown by the dark orange waymarkers.

The full walk is 5miles (8km) long and should take around 2 1/2 hours at a steady pace. Route is flat to Skelton and then rises.

The route from Skelton-on-Ure to Brampton Hall entrance is accessible by wheelchairs and scooters.

OS map Explorer 299 covers this area.

Brampton Hall

Brampton Hall

Walk down the lane past a new farmhouse. Near a bend to the south was the site of dog kennels which give the walk its name.  Near here children used an embankment for sledging. It had early origins and was the site of an encampment by General Wade’s army en-route to fight at Culloden in 1745.

The original carriageway to Brampton Hall continued straight ahead at the bend. The diverted footpath is 100 metres south to the right across fields. This area has produced archaeological finds, including a quern stone used for milling grain, Roman remains and Stone Age flints. A Roman fort was discovered south of the river when the A1 motorway was built.

Ahead of you, across fields, south of trees, is Brampton Hall, which includes fragments of a once impressive Tudor Manor House. The Hall is private. It was the home of the Tancreds, who suffered persecution as Catholics in Elizabethan England. In 1579 they were arrested and the Hall was confiscated.

The Tancreds remained Catholics and regained some of their property. William Weddle, of Newby Hall, bought Brampton Hall in 1776, and demolished most of it.  The footpath goes round the northern edge of Brampton Plantation and emerges onto a tarmac road which has been given ‘permitted footpath’ status by Newby Hall Estates.

After Brampton Hall entrance is Mulwith where Mary Ward was born in 1585. She was a Catholic, who founded religious institutions worldwide. One of these

Mary Ward

Mary Ward

established the Bar Convent in York in 1686. The house burned down in her childhood.

The driveway leads north-west to Mulwith Wood. Here, a bridleway, which is not on the route, and a dead end, goes west to the River Ure. In 1869, six people drowned when the York and Ainsty Hunt tried to cross the flooded river by ferry

After the wood, on the left across the field, is Christ the Consoler church. It was built in the 1870s by Lady Vyner, of Newby Hall, as a memorial to her son, who was held ransom by brigands in Greece and killed.

At the end of the drive is the entrance to Newby Hall, an 18th century country house built by Sir Christopher Wren with

additions by Robert Adam.

A short walk brings you to Skelton-on-Ure. Walk north to the Black Lion where a footpath behind the pub takes you east across two fields to a minor road. Cross the road and continue uphill across fields. Before you reach Cottage Lane, Skelton Windmill can be seen to the north. Turn right and follow the lane back to Langthorpe.

 

 

Walk down the lane past a new farmhouse. Near a bend to the south was the site of dog kennels which give the walk its name.  Near here children used an embankment for sledging. It had early origins and was the site of an encampment by General Wade’s army en-route to fight at Culloden in 1745.

 

Newby Hall

Newby Hall

The original carriageway to Brampton Hall continued straight ahead at the bend. The diverted footpath is 100 metres south to the right across fields. This area has produced archaeological finds, including a quern stone used for milling grain, Roman

remains and Stone Age flints. A Roman fort was discovered south of the river when the A1 motorway was built.

 

Ahead of you, across fields, south of trees, is Brampton Hall, which includes fragments of a once impressive Tudor Manor House. The Hall is private. It was the home of the Tancreds, who suffered persecution as Catholics in Elizabethan England. In 1579 they were arrested and the Hall was confiscated.

 

The Tancreds remained Catholics and regained some of their property. William Weddle, of Newby Hall, bought Brampton Hall in 1776, and demolished most of it.  The footpath goes round the northern edge of Brampton Plantation and emerges onto a tarmac road which has been given ‘permitted footpath’ status by Newby Hall Estates.

 

After Brampton Hall entrance is Mulwith where Mary Ward was born in 1585. She was a Catholic, who founded religious institutions worldwide. One of these established the Bar Convent in York in 1686. The house burned down in her childhood.

 

The driveway leads north-west to Mulwith Wood. Here, a bridleway, which is not on the route, and a dead end, goes west to the River Ure. In 1869, six people drowned when the York and Ainsty Hunt tried to cross the flooded river by ferry

 

Christ the Consoler church

Christ the Consoler church

After the wood, on the left across the field, is Christ the Consoler church. It was built in the 1870s by Lady Vyner, of Newby Hall, as a memorial to her son, who was held ransom by brigands in Greece and killed.

 

At the end of the drive is the entrance to Newby Hall, an 18th century country house built by Sir Christopher Wren with additions by Robert Adam.

 

A short walk brings you to Skelton-on-Ure. Walk north to the Black Lion where a footpath behind the pub takes you east across two fields to a minor road. Cross the road and continue uphill across fields. Before you reach Cottage Lane, Skelton Windmill can be seen to the north. Turn right and follow the lane back to Langthorpe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Download the walk Leaflet